Article: Interview: Open Source’s Path From Skunk Works to Mainstream

Hardware, Open Source, Operating Systems, Software

Interview: Open Source’s Path From Skunk Works to Mainstream

“Hello and welcome to seven layers where every episode we look at a different aspect of technology, from literal wires in the ground to switches and routers and all the way up to the exploding amount of smart devices around us.

I’m your host Connor Craven associate studios editor at SDxCentral. This week, we are continuing to look at open source technology. In just a moment, you’ll hear from Deb Bryant, senior director of the Open Source Program Office at Red Hat. If you haven’t listened to our last episode on open source tech, I highly recommend going back and giving it a listen before Deb and I began our conversation. I won’t delay you any longer, please sit back and enjoy my interview with Deb Bryant of Red Hat.”

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Article: How the need for secure supply chains is propelling blockchain

Blockchain

How the need for secure supply chains is propelling blockchain

Blockchain technology can be used to create digital records, such as certificates, public registers, or agreements, which can be stored, shared, and amended online. As products or materials change hands, records can be added, inspections and deliveries can be logged, and payments can be automated. Anything that happens to these records can be automatically documented and encrypted for security: showing amendments made, and who sent or exchanged them. There’s no need for a third party, such as a bank or a regulator, to verify these actions because it’s a shared process, secured by cryptography. Organizations can pinpoint fraud or contaminants with speed and accuracy. The technology can also be used to issue warnings about inconsistencies or trigger an automated dispute.

Article: Decentralization Demands Better Security for End-Users

Blockchain, Cyber-Security, Web 3.0

Decentralization Demands Better Security for End-Users

We are slowly transitioning to Web3.0, which is a version of today’s internet but it follows the principles of decentralization. And while today, hackers can easily exploit central servers to steal information, data, and funds, it will not be possible on Web3.0. That’s because there will be no central servers hosting platforms and applications.

Everything will be based on top of the infrastructures driven by decentralization. When that happens, hackers will have to rely on exploiting the systems of end-users. Whether it be for stealing information or funds, hackers will try and crawl into the systems of end-users to extract what they need.

This calls for users to be more aware of their security as decentralization and Web3.0 become mainstream. One of the best ways to stay secure from hackers on Web3.0 is to use decentralized private networks (DPNs), which are decentralized versions of VPNs, such as that by Deeper Network.

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Article: Blockchain in Supply Chain is Regaining Prominence in 2021

Blockchain, Innovation

Blockchain in Supply Chain is Regaining Prominence in 2021

Regardless of the shift to digital, complicated, multi-party provide chains are nonetheless closely depending on paper-based transactions to deal with a number of handoffs as items make their manner from producers to warehouses to distributors to finish shoppers.

Blockchains present a method for quite a few events to agree on the contents of a shared ledger of transactions, which has the potential to convey huge efficiencies to this course of.

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Article: Beyond Crypto: Getting Back To The Basics Of Blockchain

Blockchain, Crypto

BlockchainBeyond Crypto: Getting Back To The Basics Of Blockchain

Despite the hoopla surrounding blockchain-based investments, the goal of the technology is quite simple: to provide a secure record of transactions. Blockchains are basically super-secure ledgers that store encrypted sets of letters and numbers known as hashes in a chain of other transactions. The transactions are validated by all other computers involved with the chain, are time-stamped, and are virtually incorruptible due to the fact that the hashes from one block are contained in the previous block, which is linked to the block before it, and so on.

Those characteristics certainly make blockchain ideal for financial transactions, and banks could employ the system to bring greater speed, security and transparency to their operations. But banks have been slow to take up blockchain — instead, the technology is emerging in other, somewhat surprising industries.

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Penguin: New Internet: Blockchain Technology Could Help Us Take Back Our Data from Facebook, Google and Amazon

Advanced Cyber I/O, Autonomous Internet

Penguin: New Internet: Blockchain Technology Could Help Us Take Back Our Data from Facebook, Google and Amazon

EXTRACT:

In 2017, IBM and Walmart’s vice president for food safety, Frank Yiannas, demonstrated how blockchain might facilitate the rapid response to an outbreak or simply make it easier to comply with regulatory inspections. Yiannas assigned a team to trace the origin of a single package of mangos using traditional methods. It took them 6 days, 18 hours and 26 seconds. Using the blockchain, it took 2 seconds.

 

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