Article: BLOCKCHAIN TECHNOLOGY: Bridging the digital skills gap is key to addressing unemployment

Access, Blockchain, Knowledge

File picture: Reuters/Dado RuvicBLOCKCHAIN TECHNOLOGY: Bridging the digital skills gap is key to addressing unemployment

Implementing blockchain education programmes in communities may address and redress the current skills shortage. Lack of education remains inextricably linked to rising unemployment rates in the country, despite renewed investment in job creation initiatives by government.

Digital upskilling offers the easiest path to solving unemployment issues – by creating opportunities for and deploying the mass of stagnant talent we have in South Africa and across the continent.

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Article: Blockchain-based vaccine passports can restore confidence in New York City’s tourism

Blockchain, Innovation

Blockchain-based vaccine passports can restore confidence in New York City’s tourismBlockchain-based vaccine passports can restore confidence in New York City’s tourism

The requirement of a blockchain-based platform for monitoring vaccine standing can drastically cut back threat of virus transmission, particularly as a result of we’re speaking about vaccinating billions of individuals. It might be simpler to trace who has been vaccinated, who wasn’t, who receives future booster photographs to accommodate new variants and so forth. Plus, given the unlucky rise in pretend vaccines, such because the hundreds seized in South Africa and China, a blockchain-based passport is the easiest way to confirm people have obtained an actual vaccine. That is shall be particularly vital if tourism begins to ramp again up by the summer season.

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Article: Beyond Crypto: Getting Back To The Basics Of Blockchain

Blockchain, Crypto

BlockchainBeyond Crypto: Getting Back To The Basics Of Blockchain

Despite the hoopla surrounding blockchain-based investments, the goal of the technology is quite simple: to provide a secure record of transactions. Blockchains are basically super-secure ledgers that store encrypted sets of letters and numbers known as hashes in a chain of other transactions. The transactions are validated by all other computers involved with the chain, are time-stamped, and are virtually incorruptible due to the fact that the hashes from one block are contained in the previous block, which is linked to the block before it, and so on.

Those characteristics certainly make blockchain ideal for financial transactions, and banks could employ the system to bring greater speed, security and transparency to their operations. But banks have been slow to take up blockchain — instead, the technology is emerging in other, somewhat surprising industries.

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