Article: Blockchain for Social Good: A Field in Expansion

Blockchain, Decentralized Internet

Blockchain for Social Good: A Field in Expansion

We hope European institutions will support blockchain and other decentralized technologies so that they may contribute their transformative potential towards social justice. In the meanwhile, we are continuing to work with this vision in the P2P Models project, letting our work be guided by this technology so that it may foster collaboration, the commons, and social justice in general. We try to recognize the socio-political potential of the technology we use, without falling in techno-determinist visions. Therefore, when we work with communities we focus on co-designing with them, so that they are the ones leading the technology, rather than the other way around.

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Article: ‘Power to the People’: Privacy Was the Rallying Cry of Berlin’s Web3 Summit

Web 3.0

‘Power to the People’: Privacy Was the Rallying Cry of Berlin’s Web3 Summit

It may seem trivial in some cases, but digital anonymity is no joking matter to American whistleblower and privacy advocate Edward Snowden.

“We need someone to be able to post something truly idiotic on the internet and not have it haunt them for the rest of their lives,” he said through a webcam to a crowd of roughly 1,000 at the Web3 Summit in Berlin.

“To be able to engage in private trade is one of the basic human freedoms,” Snowden said during his Tuesday keynote. “On the internet today you can’t do that without incredible technological familiarity.”

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Article: Future of the internet debated at NetMundial in Brazil

Advanced Cyber I/O, IO Impotency
President Rousseff first announced plans for the meeting last October

Future of the internet debated at NetMundial in Brazil

A meeting to determine how the internet should be governed is under way in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The country’s president, Dilma Rousseff, organised the two-day NetMundial event following allegations the US National Security Agency (NSA) had monitored her phone and emails.

Last month the US announced plans to give up its oversight of the way net addresses are distributed. But campaigners have warned the move could backfire.

The US currently determines who runs the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA), the body responsible for regulating the internet’s codes and numbering systems. But Washington now aims to pass the duty over to the “global multi-stakeholder community” by September 2015.

Human rights group Article 19 supports that idea, but said there were potential pitfalls.