Article: Regulation, Moderation, and Social Media Decentralization

Decentralized Internet, Media, Web 3.0

Regulation, Moderation, and Social Media Decentralization

Enter the Decentralized Social Media (DSM) model, a polycentric model of online interaction recently proposed on Medium by Ross Ulbricht, the currently imprisoned founder of Silk Road, an infamous illicit online marketplace that jump-started the popularity of Bitcoin in the early 2000s.

To oversimplify, Ulbricht’s DSM model would remove those automatic and manual moderation tools from under the hood of a social media’s servers and place those same processes in the device of the social media user under the control of separate companies that stand to profit from providing moderation and aggregation services at the discretion of the device owner. Users could access any or all of the web’s available social media content feeds at once and only be fed content within their own acceptable parameters while retaining ownership of their user data. All of this would be done through the operant function of Bitcoin, the encrypted blockchain.

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Article: Open Source: More Dominant Than You Think

Open Source, Operating Systems, Software

Open Source: More Dominant Than You Think

Simply, open source software is software that is licensed in a way that allows people to freely use, study, modify, and distribute the software. These open source licenses differ greatly from proprietary software licenses, where only the original owner can copy, alter, or distribute the software.

Since open source refers to a wide variety of software programs, the use cases vary greatly. However, a Red Hat open source enterprise report found open source software is critical to infrastructure networks.

95% of respondents said open source software was strategically important to the enterprise’s overall infrastructure strategy, up from 89% in 2019. Only 42% of respondents report using proprietary software, down from 55% in 2019 and respondents expect that to keep falling — this number is expected to be down to just 32% in two years.

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