Article: Crowdsourcing for the Evolution of a Decentralized Web

Decentralized Internet, Web 3.0

Crowdsourcing for the Evolution of a Decentralized Web

This article summarises the development of the internet to the current scenario where so many interactions are dominated by dealing with global tech giants. As data has become a more and more valuable commodity, those giants are fuelling a roaring trade using our personal data, with far reaching implications of more than simply what we buy but also matters such as what news we are fed, how we seek relationships, and vote. An evolving Web 3.0 based on blockchain technology provides an opportunity for individuals to take back decentralized ownership and control of their data.

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Article: Blockchain Technology’s Potential to Disrupt Social Media Platforms

Blockchain, Decentralized Internet, Media, Web 3.0

Blockchain Technology’s Potential to Disrupt Social Media Platforms

While mainstream social media platforms have revolutionized the way we interact with one another and made eCommerce more effective thanks to targeted advertising, these platforms have serious flaws, notably data and privacy breached that should not be ignored. The advent of blockchain social media offers a plausible solution to these challenges, allowing individuals to interact over decentralized and distributed networks without third parties’ praying eyes.

Blockchain social media offers numerous benefits. Among other benefits, they allow users to enjoy greater privacy, assert better control of their data, and express themselves freely without drastic consequences or account censorship. Better still, decentralized social media allows users to earn income on their activities on the platform, including content creation and other interactions.

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Article: How To Decentralize Virtual Communities?

Decentralized Internet, Media

How To Decentralize Virtual Communities?

Decentralized social networks and communities provide a higher level of control and autonomy for members than centralized ones. There are also federated decentralized social networks and communities. The principle of interaction between users is significantly different.

For example, Twitter allows users to post and receive messages only to those with Twitter accounts (for example, Twitter users cannot post to Facebook accounts due to the lack of cross-platform). Federated decentralized social networks and communities allow users to communicate independently of the network and community. This is the main difference between decentralized social networks and centralized social networks like Facebook and Twitter.

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Article: Ditching Big Tech for a More Decentralised Life

Decentralized Internet

Ditching Big Tech for a More Decentralised Life

A plethora of privacy and security issues, daily ransomware attacks putting sensitive data at risk of being published led to a decision. In February this year, I decided to de-Facebook and de-Google my life. I will admit that, as with any (I will call it what it is) addiction, it was a little hard to withdraw. Everyone handles social media detox differently, and I realised the best way for me would be to carry it out in stages.

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Defdog: Attack On Parler A Criminal Conspiracy? Update

Advanced Cyber I/O

Sure looks like a Deep State conspiracy.

k33p !7 m0v!n@bitburner

PARLER GOT FUCKING OWNED BAD…and I mean BAD

This group of Internet Warriors then used that account, to create a handful of other ADMINISTRATION accounts, and then created a script that ended up creating MILLIONS of fake administration accounts.”   Source & related images of text
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Mongoose: Mastodon.org to Replace Twitter?

Autonomous Internet

The world is rising up against #GoogleGestapo. Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are the early targets for replacement but Amazon, Google, MeetUp, and Wikipedia are all on the priority target list.

See below for graphic and rationale.  Not the whole solution but worthy.

 

How it works

Anyone can run a server of Mastodon. Each server hosts individual user accounts, the content they produce, and the content they subscribe to.

Each user account has a globally unique name (e.g. @user@example.com), consisting of the local username (@user), and the domain name of the server it is on (example.com).

Users can follow each other, regardless of where they’re hosted — when a local user follows a user from a different server, the server subscribes to that user’s updates for the first time.

Why is that cool?

Fediverse

Servers are run independently by different people and organizations. They can apply wildly different moderation policies, so you can find or make one that fits your taste perfectly. A decentralized network is harder for governments to censor. If one server goes bankrupt or starts acting unethically, the network persists so you never have to worry about migrating your friends and audience to a yet another platform again.