Article: Mythbusting The Stigma Around Open Source Technology

Open Source, Software

Mythbusting The Stigma Around Open Source Technology

The most common myth is that changes and edits can be made to an open-source tool by any and all contributors at any time, similar to how one would make corrections and changes to Wikipedia. This is not true. With open-source projects, coders and developers can make enhancements, changes and additions to the code, but what is not as well-known is that those code contributions have to be submitted to the proprietary tool owners via pull request. These pull requests are then reviewed, critiqued and sent back to the contributor for edits and corrections.

Acting as the gatekeepers of their open-source tool, the main developers have the right to control what is and is not added to their tool. They can deny contributions if they feel they are unnecessary, they can return the request with corrections for various reasons such as sloppy code or incomplete additions and they also make suggestions for the contribution to make it more useful when and if it is added to the tool.

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Penguin: Open Source Venture Capital, Conference, Seeking to Develop Sustainable Business Models

Software

A Conference to Find Viable Business Models to Commercialize Open Source Software

Organizers of the Open Core Summit – which took part this month at the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco – announced the COSS (Commercial Open-Source Software) Platform.

The goal of this initiative is to help commercial open-source organizations develop viable business models. “We want to educate, grow, fund and connect leaders of COSS companies,” as explained to IBL News by Joseph Jacks, founder of OSS Capital, a venture-capital firm who put together the Open Core Summit.

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Phi Beta Iota: Open Source has lost momentum as a result of those pulling their code to attack legitimate US Government functions such as Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Joseph Jacks is on  to something hugely important — he needs to ensure that his contracts include non-volatility associated with attempts to impose individual biases on national agencies.

See Especially:

Open source developers: Stop blocking organizations you don’t like

After protest, open source software company Chef will let ICE contract expire

Fake GNUs: Keep politics out of open source software licences

See Also:

Why Open Source misses the point of Free Software

Penguin: Open Source and Big Data

Autonomous Internet, Data, Software

Weighing Open Source’s Worth for the Future of Big Data

“If you’re trying to overcome a technology like relational databases, which have been developed over decades and had gestation from every major university in the world that does computer science research, it takes a long time to climb that hill,” Kreps says. “What’s very different for us is there hasn’t really been this incredibly well-developed infrastructure layer in the space we’re entering. We get to kind of make it up as we go along, which is a huge advantage. “

This perhaps is the reason why — despite the availability of MySQL, MariaDB, and PostgreSQL RDBMs, the advent of modern NoSQL and NewSQL solutions, and scalable Hadoop and object-storage alternatives — proprietary RDBMs continue to drive the lion’s share of enterprise spending in the data management space.

 

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Phi Beta Iota: The time has come for a clean-sheet fresh start.  The Internet was designed for machine to machine communication, it was never designed for humans or content. We process less than 1% of the Big Data we have in hand and that in  turn is less than 1% of what is known. A post-Amazon post-Google Internet will be distributed and encrypted, including the 50% of humanity not on the Internet today, and enable paragraph level linking and weighting.