Article: Midcoast Internet Development Corp. vote is June 8

Dark Fiber, Hardware

Midcoast Internet Development Corp. vote is June 8

For operation and internet service, Midcoast Internet is built around a public/private partnership model, where the communities own the infrastructure, which is commonly called the dark fiber. The network is operated by an experienced professional contractor and serviced by experienced private providers (ISPs), who lease space on the open access system.

With opponents going after us, we wish to remind our communities of what we are working so hard to provide:

  • Community ownership
  • Professional operation
  • Professional service providers
  • Open access network
  • Fiber to the premises (residential and business)
  • Lower costs for service
  • Higher-quality service
  • Public-private partnership, focused on universal coverage for unserved and underserved
  • State-of-the-art fiber-optic technology
  • Local customer service and support
  • With no tax increase

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Article: Baltimore City Schools expands bandwidth for students, teachers

Academia, Dark Fiber, Hardware

Baltimore City Schools expands bandwidth for students, teachers

Helping students and teachers stay online has been a challenge for school districts across the state. Most cite a lack of bandwidth used to transfer data from one point to another.

The school system has invested in what’s called dark fiber or the laying of dark fiber lines across the city. It will allow for faster and stronger internet signals in schools.

“I’d liken it to the equivalent of going from one lane on a highway, so we are at one gig right now. Once we actualize all the work and it’s completed, we go to 10 gigs, so just imagine us going from one lane to 10 lanes,” Rading said.

“Broadband is very critical to education,” said Kendrick Gordon, director of the Office of Statewide Broadband. “What we have done is made a lot of progress in identifying needs and now we’re starting to address those needs, so we’ve come a long ways as far as our understanding what our needs are.”

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Article: Netwise close to opening new London data center, Zayo will provide dark fiber into facility

Dark Fiber, Hardware

Netwise close to opening new London data center, Zayo will provide dark fiber into facility

Zayo will provide diverse dark fiber routes into the new location, providing connections back to Netwise’s existing core nodes in Telehouse North and Equinix LD8.

“We’ve used Zayo to deliver high capacity links elsewhere on our network for quite some time, so this is a natural evolution of our growing relationship. The diverse route options provided by Zayo will enable the resilient interconnection of our new London East data center with the rest of our core network,” said Matt Seaton, Senior Manager at Netwise.

“The newest collaboration with Netwise will enable Zayo to meet the growing demands for connectivity solutions in a major European hub,” said Yannick Leboyer, Europea CCO at Zayo. “Our unique, low latency fiber network will provide high-quality connections for service providers in the UK and across Europe.

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Article: Open Access Fiber to Improve U.S. Internet Connectivity

Dark Fiber, Hardware, Open Source

Open Access Fiber to Improve U.S. Internet Connectivity

With Democratic control of the House, Senate, and White House and widespread support for an infrastructure bill, the United States has a narrow opportunity to catch up to the rest of the world on last-mile fiber deployment. Assuming that the Accessible, Affordable Internet for All Act will be the basis for any legislation included in the infrastructure bill, the act should be revised with open access infrastructure (including open conduit and dark fiber that are subject to government oversight) as its central tenet.

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Article: Development of Dark Fiber Optic Networks Accelerates Data Center Alley Connectivity

Autonomous Internet, Dark Fiber

Development of Dark Fiber Optic Networks Accelerates Data Center Alley Connectivity

The continued growth and evolution of the digital economy remains a driver for strong data center growth and development throughout Virginia. As reported in a March 2021 Virginia Business article, a new dark fiber network is expected to expand opportunities for data center development in strategic Virginia locations.

This new 680-mile regional fiber optic network will connect the large concentration of existing data centers in Northern Virginia to the Virginia Beach cable landing station and, in turn, provide access to the subsea, intercontinental high-speed internet cables running to Europe and South America.

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Article: Let’s utilize unused fiber to expand broadband access

Dark Fiber

Let’s utilize unused fiber to expand broadband access

Over the last year, the lack of broadband access in New Mexico was on full display. Our expansive state needs innovative, cost-effective solutions to this problem.

We are business leaders, spanning six different sectors, taking part in the Leadership Albuquerque program through the Greater Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce. We believe broadband access is critical to our economic growth and well-being. Broadband brings people together – teachers to students, doctors to patients, first responders to the sick or hurting, and family members to one another. It enables the connections we need in order to learn, grow and lead productive and healthy lives.

As such, we support Senate Bill 360, which would allow unused fiber – called “dark fiber” – that is already in the ground across New Mexico to extend broadband access to rural communities. Sponsored by Sen. Michael Padilla, D-Albuquerque, the bill would reduce the need to build new broadband infrastructure across miles and miles of land by using what we already have to reach our most vulnerable communities.

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Article: 5 Things You Should Know About Dark Fiber

Dark Fiber

5 Things You Should Know About Dark Fiber

Coenen began by explaining that the term “dark fiber” refers to fiber optic cable that has been laid in the ground but isn’t being used. “Whenever somebody buries a fiberoptic cable, most of the cost is in getting that cable into the ground,” explained Coenen. “Something like less than 10 percent of the cost of such a project is actually the fiberoptic cable. So, what they do is bury as many actual fibers as possible.” In many cases, less than half of the actual cables underground are being used, leaving the rest available for companies to lease.

So why would an enterprise be interested in leasing this dark fiber?

  1. It’s all about the money.
  2. Dark fiber can also improve latency.
  3. Dark fiber can provide redundancy.
  4. Dark fiber does require some expertise.
  5. You shouldn’t be afraid of dark fiber.

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