Article: Special Project: The Rise of Open Hardware

Hardware, Open Source, Software

Special Project: The Rise of Open Hardware

Market forces, limits of scaling and the emergence of disruptive technologies like artificial intelligence have fueled the rise of open source hardware. Still, as this EE Times Special Project demonstrates, physical, legal and economic barriers remain as a fledgling group of open source advocates and a handful of commercial vendors seek to democratized hardware design.

Those proponents and early adopters have focused their energies on reduced instruction set computing, the foundational RISC architecture that emerged from the University of California at Berkeley in the 1980s. RISC has seeded the beginnings of an ecosystem extending beyond processor technology to include open interconnects, network and, ultimately, open computing.

As with open source software, key chip makers are eyeing the open hardware movement. Some perhaps with trepidation as semiconductor scaling runs out of steam and monster GPUs and CPUs accelerators approach the end of the line, giving way to new heterogeneous devices and chiplets.

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Article: Open-Source Supercomputer Code WarpX Presents Path for Shrinking Particle Accelerators

Academia, Autonomous Internet

Open-Source Supercomputer Code WarpX Presents Path for Shrinking Particle Accelerators

When we think of the particle accelerators that elucidate the building blocks of nature, we think of spectacular and massive facilities like the 27-kilometer-circumference Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the proton-crashing instrument at CERN famous for the Higgs boson discovery.

But what if there were much smaller alternatives to the giant machines that could probe physics beyond the large colliders’ reach? There just may be such a possibility: laser-plasma accelerators, “a promising candidate to significantly reduce the cost and improve the compactness of beam generators,” says Jean-Luc Vay, a senior physicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and head of the Accelerator Modeling Program in the lab’s Accelerator Technology and Applied Physics Division.

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