Article: What Is a Decentralized Exchange (DEX)?

Blockchain, Crypto, Money

What Is a Decentralized Exchange (DEX)?

A decentralized exchange uses smart contracts (automatically-executed protocols) to facilitate trading between individuals, but doesn’t take control of their coins.

DEXs handle this in one of three ways: an on-chain order book, an off-chain order book, or an automated market maker approach.

In an on-chain order book, every transaction is written onto a blockchain. That’s not just the actual purchase, but also the request to purchase or cancel an order. It’s the ultimate in decentralization, but the need to put everything on a blockchain can make it more expensive and slower.

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Article: Yes, Your NFTs Can Go Missing—Here’s What You Can Do About It

Crypto

Yes, Your NFTs Can Go Missing—Here's What You Can Do About It - DecryptYes, Your NFTs Can Go Missing—Here’s What You Can Do About It

Remember when musician 3LAU sold an NFT album for $11 million on the Gemini-run marketplace NiftyGateway? It might seem like forever ago, but it was at the beginning of March.

And now it’s missing.

To be sure, you can still find a copy of it on NiftyGateway, but the actual NFT asset is no longer discoverable online. It exists only on a centralized provider, a business that could eventually go bust as so many businesses eventually do.

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Article: Brave Browser Is Building Its Own Decentralized Exchange Aggregator

Blockchain, Decentralized Internet

Brave Browser Is Building Its Own Decentralized Exchange Aggregator

Privacy web browser Brave, which rewards its 25 million+ users with its Basic Attention Token (BAT), is building new functionality into its platform.

According to its BAT Roadmap 2.0, announced today, Brave is creating a decentralized exchange (DEX) aggregator as well as a new “Brave Wallet” to replace its current crypto wallets.

The additions will extend the firm’s reach beyond web browsing and into decentralized finance (DeFi), the multibillion dollar industry of crypto-based protocols that allow people to earn interest, lend assets, and trade tokens without going through a financial institution.

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Article: What the Google Antitrust Lawsuit Means for Web 3

Blockchain, Web 3.0

What the Google Antitrust Lawsuit Means for Web 3

This week, the US Department of Justice and 11 states filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google.

According to the filing, Google has used exclusionary agreements with mobile phone and browser companies to become the dominant search engine, controlling nearly the entire search market, all the while acquiring companies such as YouTube and Android to cement its omnipresence.

In short, it’s a monopoly, a totemic institution that controls broad swaths of the tech market and limits user options. And, it may just be holding back Web 3.0, the broad term for a decentralized internet in which content isn’t controlled by conglomerates but by individual creators—just as previous monopolies attempted to stave off Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 technologies.

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