Article: The Next Industry Open Data Will Shake Up

Civil Society, Data, Innovation, Open Source

The Next Industry Open Data Will Shake Up

There’s so much hype around the idea of open data regimes that the natural inclination is to be cynical and say it will never deliver on its promise.

But let’s suspend our cynicism, if only for a while, and imagine a world where compliance-driven open data regimes (actually) put power back into the hands of consumers. The consumers’ decisions then drive significant change among providers and, as a result, change the world for the better.

Consumers already have so much information and data on their phones and already have the power to change.

With these kinds of tools in their pockets, the power to change will literally be at our fingertips.

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Article: Open data journalism, making stories better

Data, Media, Open Source

Open data journalism, making stories better

Traditional journalistic work is presented to the reader in its complete, hopefully perfect form, while open journalism encourages reader participation from the start. It represents a key change in the role’s perception of news agencies—rather than being a sheer distributor of the news; it becomes a knowledgeable voice that steers a discussion around the news.

Open journalism has the power to turn all of us into experts, each with our own unique experience, skills, and perspective that contribute to the global story, and reporters who can use the power of the web can produce stronger, better stories.

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Article: Interplanetary File System Could Pave the Way for a Distributed, Permanent Web

Data, Decentralized Internet, Open Source, Web 3.0

Interplanetary File System Could Pave the Way for a Distributed, Permanent Web

“IPFS is general purpose, and has little in the way of storage limitations,” wrote Neocities founder Kyle Drake in a blog post announcing his company’s decision to become the first major website to implement IPFS. “It can serve files that are large or small. It automatically breaks up larger files into smaller chunks, allowing IPFS nodes to download (or stream) files from not just one server like with HTTP, but hundreds of them simultaneously. The IPFS network becomes a finely-grained, trust-less, distributed, easily federated content delivery network (CDN). This is useful for pretty much everything involving data: images, video streaming, distributed databases, entire operating systems, blockchains, backups of 8-inch floppy disks, and most important for us, static web sites.”

Ultimately, these core notions behind IPFS may be one solution to build a distributed, permanent web. It’s one possible alternative to the brittle and hypercentralized system that we’ve now arrived at with outdated protocols like HTTP — and potentially a useful hedge against an uncertain future.

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Article: Understanding the Data Mesh

Data, Decentralized Internet

Understanding the Data Mesh

Once data is treated as a product, it quickly becomes evident that a centralized model will never work. Instead, data products must be built in a decentralized way by the teams that own the data.

Much like a modern service stack is decentralized with hundreds or even thousands of services owned by multiple teams building their own APIs, Riccomini thinks a similar model can make a data mesh architecture a reality.

“A data mesh takes service stack best-practices and applies them to the data layer. Not only should application development teams define APIs for their business logic (in the form of web services); they should do so for their data as well. The infrastructure and culture needed for the two are remarkably similar,” he writes.

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Article: Covid-19 Vaccination Passes Could Catalyze Self-Sovereign Identity Adoption

Data, Decentralized Internet, Open Source, Software

Covid-19 Vaccination Passes Could Catalyze Self-Sovereign Identity Adoption

Article: What is a distributed VPN that enhances security and communication speed when using the Internet?

Data, Decentralized Internet, Open Source, Web 3.0

What is a distributed VPN that enhances security and communication speed when using the Internet?

The structure of a centralized VPN server has a fundamental weakness. Even the most reputable and reliable centralized VPN providers may not be vulnerable to hacking, information exploitation, government interference, etc. and provide bandwidth in an optimal and dynamic way. There is sex.

Decentralized VPNs, by their very nature, solve some of these problems. A distributed VPN does not rely on static connections and uses dynamic connections, a flexible and distributed network with independently operated servers.

As a result, distributed VPNs have a wide range of trusted, high-quality providers available. In this way, through the use of a large number of secure servers, a decentralized VPN can operate more efficiently and securely than a centralized VPN.

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Article: Is a new decentralized internet, or Web 3.0, possible?

Cloud, Data, Decentralized Internet, Open Source, Web 3.0

Is a new decentralized internet, or Web 3.0, possible?

The next level may be an actual merger of the existing internet protocol (TCP/IP) with blockchain technology . The result would be an internet capable of carrying not only packets of data but also services in a decentralized manner. This “merger” would foster a more open, resilient and plural internet that is capable of natively offering essential services such as information search, decentralized domain name management, digital identity, electronic messaging, data storage, computing power (artificial intelligence), confidentiality, traceability and electronic signature.

These services have become universal resources of the internet and, as such, should be natively provided by the network and managed as commons.

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Article: How cryptographic ledgers are helping geospatial researchers deal with information overload

Blockchain, Data

How cryptographic ledgers are helping geospatial researchers deal with information overload

Out of all the potential use cases of geospatial services, it could be that location-based real-time monitoring applications are the fastest growing. Some experts believe that these are expected to be the biggest drivers of the Earth Observation field in coming years, which could end up creating an unprecedented amount of data. Existing GIS solutions for long had to deal with increasingly large datasets, but this could potentially portend the creation of exponentially massive ones.

Computer industry representatives believe that blockchain-based solutions could be used to manage these geospatial datasets regardless of their physical size. Agricultural supply chain managers have been turning to distributed cryptographic ledgers to manage GIS data collected in that industry. Programmers might soon start to apply these to the observation industry, which has been one of the biggest information-creators in recent years.

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Article: The centralised nature of our internet makes outages like Fastly’s inevitable

Cloud, Data, Decentralized Internet

The centralised nature of our internet makes outages like Fastly’s inevitable

While Fastly’s outage is a wake up call for its customers, who will be doing back-of-the-envelope calculations to work out their losses during the downtime, there’s no obvious solution, warns Kevin Curran, Professor of Cyber Security at Ulster University and senior member of technical professional organisation IEEE.

While Sir Tim is busy dedicating his time to building a newly-decentralised version of the internet via his web platform Solid, until the public grasps how important that data is and mounts a full backlash against the ways in which tech giants abuse it, the ways in which the internet operates is unlikely to change, Prof Curran adds. Hospitals and banks and airlines and power grids and other major infrastructure systems need to ensure they have sufficient extra security layers and protocols in place for when people make configuration changes and to crucially, to learn from their mistakes, he says. “At the end of the day, the five giants rule the internet. But the internet really can be brought down by one person making a mistake.”

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Article: Busting Five Common Myths about Decentralized Storage

Cloud, Data, Decentralized Internet

Busting Five Common Myths about Decentralized Storage

Centralized cloud storage is data held in massive data centers run by a single organization that consumes large amounts of energy. Decentralized cloud storage encrypts data, breaks it up and distributes it for storage on drives that are run by different organizations in lots of different places,  each with a different power supply and network connection, creating something much less wasteful. There are no data centers, no storage oligopolies and no vendor lock-in.

At first blush, it sounds a bit crazy. How can that work? How can it be feasible? How can it even be real?

The good news is it is very real and very feasible today. Here is our take on the common misconceptions we hear every day about decentralized cloud storage and the facts to bust them.

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